Global Aviation Consultants GAC UPDATE Issue 23 - March 2013

By Vivienne Sandercock

Global Aviation Consultants GAC UPDATE Issue 23 March 2013

Contents

1. Editor's Message
2. NTSB: 'too risky' for lithium batteries to fly as cargo on planes
3. Hazard, Incident and Accident Statistics
4. Henley/Global Training
5. NCAA boss warns against corruptible aviation workers
6. Airline industry at its safest since the dawn of the jet age
7. Improving aviation safety, driving african development
8. ERP/AEMS
9. Supreme Court pulls up aviation regulator over implementation of safety norms (India)
10. News from Jo'burg Airports
11. Commercial Airlines/Airports Information
12. Security/Safety Tip of the Month
13. Advertisements
14. Finale


1. EDITOR'S MESSAGE


The recent report of the helicopter pilot who died when he collided with a crane and a tower block in London, UK reveals a couple of pointers which, seriously, need to be shared. The weather was atrocious with the temperature and dew point being exactly the same in sub-zero temperatures. For those of you who have had the misfortune to operate in Europe in the winter this is a serious harbinger of death for anyone that wishes to operate in such conditions i.e. freezing fog = zero visibility with icing conditions. Another point was that the pilot knew he should not have flown - indeed he shared that thought with another Pilot in an SMS. And the final point is that the Pilot was, as far as we can find out, continuously using his cell phone to communicate with the Charterer amongst others. I urge you to please re-read Issue 22 of GAC UPDATE which covered the personal use of cell phones and other equipment by pilots.



And finally, for those of us who (as I was) were around when Clipper 103 exploded over Lockerbie (Scotland) on the 21st of December 1988 murdering 259 passengers and crew, all of whom were going home to be with their loved ones over Christmas, together with the 11 people on the ground who were also getting ready to spend time with their families, you will be very pleased to hear that finally the real truth about how the bomb came to be on the aircraft should be revealed. The new Libyan Government has agreed to allow the Dumfries and Galloway Constabulary to visit Libya and have access to all of the applicable files. It appears that the former Dictator, who would never allow the Constabulary to visit Libya, felt that just paying up millions of dollars in compensation to the families whilst providing a scapegoat to take the blame, was all that was needed to worm his way back onto the political world stage. I, personally, think that the former management of the then State Airline and Regulatory Authority must be more than a little concerned about this turn of events.



Vivienne Sandercock


Note: Airports are now Aerodromes and the Apron is now the Ramp according to ICAO


2. NTSB: 'TOO RISKY' FOR LITHIUM BATTERIES TO FLY AS CARGO ON PLANES
WASHINGTON (AP)



At the same time the government certified Boeing's 787 Dreamliners as safe, federal rules barred the type of batteries used to power the airliner's electrical systems from being carried as cargo on passenger planes because of the fire risk. Now the situation is reversed. But new rules exempt aircraft batteries from the ban on large lithium ion batteries as cargo on flights by passenger planes. In effect, that means the Dreamliner's batteries are now allowed to fly only if they're not attached to a Dreamliner.



The Regulations were published on 7th January 2013, the same day as a battery fire in a Japan Airlines 787 parked at Boston's Logan International Airport that took fire fighters nearly 40 minutes to put out. The "multiple systems" that were designed to prevent the 787s batteries from catching fire "did not work as intended," The timing of the two events appears coincidental.


Pilots and safety advocates say the situation doesn't make sense. If the 787s battery system is too risky to allow the planes to fly, then it's too risky to ship the same batteries as cargo on airliners, they said. "These incidents have raised the whole issue of lithium batteries and their use in aviation," said Jim Hall, a former National Transportation Safety Board Chairman. "Any transport of lithium batteries on commercial aircraft for any purpose should be suspended until an NTSB investigation is complete and we know more about this entire issue." Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger, a former US Airways pilot famed for his precision flying that enabled passengers and crew to survive an emergency landing on the Hudson River in New York, said in an interview that he wouldn't be comfortable flying an airliner that carried lithium ion aircraft batteries in its cargo hold. "The potential for self-ignition, for uncontained fires, is huge," he said. The new regulations "need to be looked at very hard in the cold light of day, particularly with what has happened with the 787 batteries." doesn't make sense. If the 787s battery system is too risky to allow the planes to fly, then it's too risky to ship the same batteries as cargo on airliners, they said. "These incidents have raised the whole issue of lithium batteries and their use in aviation," said Jim Hall, a former National Transportation Safety Board Chairman. "Any transport of lithium batteries on commercial aircraft for any purpose should be suspended until an NTSB investigation is complete and we know more about this entire issue." Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger, a former US Airways pilot famed for his precision flying that enabled passengers and crew to survive an emergency landing on the Hudson River in New York, said in an interview that he wouldn't be comfortable flying an airliner that carried lithium ion aircraft batteries in its cargo hold. "The potential for self-ignition, for uncontained fires, is huge," he said. The new regulations "need to be looked at very hard in the cold light of day, particularly with what has happened with the 787 batteries."



The battery rules were changed in order to conform U.S. shipping requirements with international standards as required by Congress. The organization's standards normally aren't binding. But a provision inserted into U.S. law at the behest of the battery industry and their shippers says the rules cannot be stricter than the U.N. agency's standards. Previously, U.S. regulations prohibited the shipment of lithium ion batteries on passenger planes in packages weighing more than 11 pounds, although heavier batteries could be shipped on cargo planes. The new rules allow the shipment of lithium ion batteries weighing as much as 77 pounds, but only if they are aircraft batteries. Shipments of other lithium ion batteries greater than 11 pounds are still prohibited. The 787s two batteries weigh 63 pounds each. It's the first airliner to make extensive use of lithium ion batteries, which weigh less and store more power than other batteries of a similar size. The aircraft battery exemption was created for the convenience of the airline industry, which wants to be able to quickly ship replacement batteries to planes whose batteries are depleted or have failed. Sometimes it's faster to do that using a passenger plane. Some members of the Committee involved in the changes opposed allowing shipments of lithium ion aircraft batteries on passenger planes, saying safety regulations that let the batteries be used onboard planes don't necessarily ensure they can be transported safely as cargo, according to a summary of the meeting posted online by the U.N. agency. Concern about the transport of lithium ion aircraft batteries on passenger planes isn't limited to the batteries used in the 787. The Airbus A350, expected to be ready next year, was going to make extensive use of lithium ion batteries. However Airbus has now decided against this and is looking at an alternative power source. Cargo airline pilots long have complained about the dangers of transporting lithium batteries. The batteries are suspected of causing or contributing to the severity of an onboard fire that led to the September 2010 crash of a United Parcel Service plane near Dubai, killing both pilots. The two pilots of another UPS plane barely managed to escape the aircraft before it was consumed by fire moments after landing in Philadelphia in 2006.



Fires involving rechargeable lithium-ion batteries can reach 1,100 degrees and are extremely difficult to put out.



Follow Joan Lowy at




No extinguishing compound in current general use works better than water when dealing with a lithium-ion battery fire and apparently it takes a great deal of that to be effective. Editor



HAZARD, INCIDENT AND ACCIDENT REPORTS



FIXED WING ACCIDENTS IN AFRICA - 2013



DATE TYPE FATALITIES LOCATION



01 Jan Aeroprakt A-22 FoxBat 2 Phalaborwa Airport, Limpopo, RSA
10 Jan Windlass Aquilla 2 R304, outside of Klipheuwel, WC, RSA
17 Jan CASA 212 0 AFB Bloemfontein, Tempe Airfield, RSA
03 Feb Jabiru SPT 0 N4 Motorway, South of Witbank, MP, RSA
05 Feb Cessna 0 East African Aviation Academy, Soroti, Uganda
05 Feb Light Aircraft 3 Niamey Airport, Niger
11 Feb Military 3 crew/6 pax Monrovia, Liberia
23 Feb B733 0 RWY26L, Muscat, Oman
24 Feb Aeroprakt A-22 FoxBat 2 Initial climb out from Nanyuki Civil Airstrip, Kenya
28 Feb A321 0 Hurghada, Egypt


Source, amongst others, PlaneCrash info.com; News24, Aviation Herald, Flight Safety Information


ROTOR WING ACCIDENTS IN AFRICA - 2013



DATE TYPE FATALITIES LOCATION



18 Jan Bell 47G 3B.1 0 Hibberdene, KZN, RSA



ACCIDENTS/INCIDENTS REPORTED TO THE SA CAA - JANUARY 2013 INCIDENTS REPORTED TO THE SA CAA - JANUARY 2013



REF DATE TYPE LOCATION FATALITIES CIRCUMSTANCES TYPEOF OP



9118 01 Jan Aeroprakt A-22 Phalaborwa Airport, Limpopo, RSA 2 Engine failure. A/c was consumed by post impact fire. PVT
9119 06 Jan Windlass Aquilla Monzi, nr St. Lucia, KZN, RSA 0 Pilot lost control due to strong winds. The aircraft sustained minor damage. PVT
9120 06 Jan Bantam S20°05'53.9” E030°42'41.5” MP, RSA 0 Pilot flew into the valley and was unable to clear it and subsequently the aircraft crashed PVT
9122 10 Jan Windlass Aquilla S: 33° 37' 674” E: 18° 40' 947” WC, RSA 2 Engine splutter, followed by a loud bang. Post impact fire. PVT
9123 10 Jan Paraglider Bantry Bay, WC, RSA 1 Strong winds and a vortex caused the a/c to spiral resulting in loss of control. Crashed into a house PVT
9124 13 Jan Windlass Aquilla Port Shepstone Beach, KZN, RSA 0 Suspected low fuel pilot carried out a precautionary landing. A/c was extensively damaged PVT
9125 15 Jan Sling LSA S: 26° 19' 40” E: 28° 04' 00” WC, RSA 0 a/c was too high and the pilot lost control in a gust of wind. Hand landing caused substantial damage PVT
9126 18 Jan Bell 407 Hibberdene, Nr.Margate, KZN, RSA 0 Sudden decay in engine power caused forced landing. Post impact fire. Crop Spray
9127 22 Jan C152 Virginia Airport, KZN, RSA 0 A student pilot inadvertently taxied his aircraft into another parked aircraft TRNG
9128 23 Jan Rans S6 RWY 05,Swellendam, (FASX), WC, RSA 0 Loss of control during training TRNG
9129 25 Jan R44 Greygoose Farm, KZN, RSA 0 Low flying resulting in a wire strike PVT
9131 25 Jan Bantam B22J Umfolozi Game Reserve, KZN, RSA 0 Engine failure followed by a forced landing
9132 28 Jan PA14 Nylstroom Aero Club, Limpopo, RSA 0 Lost control of the aircraft on landing causing the a/c to overturn PVT
9135 20 Jan SR20 RWY 06 FALA, GP, RSA 0 High descent rate, hard landing and a/c porpoised and experienced a prop-strike TRNG
9138 30 Jan Piper PA22 Petit Aero, GP, RSA 0 During landing, following a circuit, the pilot allowed the aircraft to stall. On touch down the aircraft flipped onto its roof PVT


FIXED WING INCIDENTS AND HAZARDS REPORTED TO GAC - FEBRUARY 2013



ACC INC HAZ DATE A/C TYPE LOCATION FATALITIES CIRCUMSTANCES TYPE OF OP



INC 3 Feb TBA Bronkhorstspruit 0 A/C made an emergency landing on a road because of mechanical problems TBA
INC 5 Feb TBA Snake Park Beach, Durban 0 The aircraft, which was carrying two people, reportedly suffered engine failure on Tuesday morning. The plane safely landed on the beachfront and occupants were found outside of the plane, unharmed.” TBA
INC 14 Feb Beech Baron Rand Airport, FAGM, GP, RSA 0 Undercarriage not indicating down and locked. Pilot executed a safe landing PVT
INC 24 Feb B1900 Abidjan Airport, Cote d'Ivoire 0 Bird Strike caused by raptors and swallows present on the threshold. COM
INC 27 Feb B738 Cape Town Airport, (FACT), WC, RSA 0 Rejected take off and return to ramp COM



HAZ FEB Various Rand Airport, FAGM, GP, RSA

0 7 different aircraft committed CTAs PVT
ACCIDENTS AND HAZARDS REPORTED TO GAC - FEBRUARY 2013 INCIDENTS AND HAZARDS REPORTED TO GAC - FEBRUARY 2013



ACC INC HAZ DATE AIR CRAFT TYPE LOCATION FATALITIES CIRCUMSTANCES TYPE OF OP



INC 16 Feb RH44 4km North of FAGC 0 Bird Strike (European Stork) TRNG
HAZ Feb AS350 B3 Saudi Arabia 0 Sediment found in fuel tanker SRVY
HAZ Feb AS350 Saudi Arabia 0 Pilot ferrying the a/c to Saudi Arabia COM B3 reported that there was a vibration on the pedals. A crack was found on an elastomeric bearing
HAZ Feb AS350 Nelspruit, MP, RSA 0 Contamination found in the fuel drain COM B2 sample from main tank. The conclusion was that it came from the lining of a 200 litre drum.
HAZ Feb AS350 B3 Saudi Arabia 0 Flying a pipeline survey on headings of 090° and 270° the first 30 minutes after 07h00 means the sun is low above the horizon and easterly lines are flown directly into the rising sun and in the afternoon into the setting sun. SRVY
INC 28 Feb Bell 207 Rand Airport, FAGM, GP, RSA 0 Pilot made a safe precautionary landing on RWY29 following a rotor rpm problem COM



AERODROME HAZARDS, INCIDENTS AND ACCIDENTS



TYPE DATE AERODROME HAZARD, INCIDENT OR ACCIDENT DESCRIPTION



HAZ Jan Goma Aerodrome, DRC VOR is unserviceable so operators are treating it as a VFR approach. Bird hazard prevalent Feb-May
HAZ All Bunia, DRC Bunia's runway surface is in bad condition and is a major safety hazard for fixed-wing operations
HAZ Feb-May Dungu, DRC Bird hazard prevalent
HAZ Feb-May Beni, DRC Bird hazard prevalent
HAZ Feb-May Bukavu, DRC Bird hazard prevalent
HAZ Feb-May Kindu, DRC Bird hazard prevalent
HAZ Jan-Jun Accra Aerodrome, Ghana Apron extension in progress at the international airport, possible delays on arrival and departure.
HAZ Jan-Jun Accra Aerodrome, Ghana Increased bird activity in the area
HAZ Jan-Dec Sunyani Aerodrome, Ghana Broken surfaces and pebbles on RWY 25/07. Pilots are advised to exercise caution during landing and take-off.
INC 19 Feb Rand Aerodrome, (FAGM), RSA Lightning strike hit a pipe near to the helipad 3 opposite H6 causing explosive relocation of a conduit pipe which travelled under the helipad and came out about 20 feet away.
HAZ Feb Grand Central Aerodrome, (FAGC) RSA A nearby quarry where some parts of pilot training takes place has become the breeding ground for storks. A NOTAM has been issued on this.



18 KILLED AS HOT AIR BALLOON EXPLODES, PLUMMETS IN EGYPT



(CNN) --Eighteen tourists on a hot air balloon ride in southern Egypt were killed on 26 February 2013 when a balloon exploded and plummeted to the ground. It is the deadliest hot air balloon accident in the world in at least 20 years. Twenty-one people were in the balloon when it dropped about 300 meters (almost 1,000 feet) in the city of Luxor, the Egyptian interior ministry said. State-run EgyNews reported that a gas explosion caused the crash. Passengers in the balloon included 19 foreign tourists: nine from Hong Kong, four from Japan, three from Britain, two from France and one from
Hungary, officials said. An Egyptian pilot and another Egyptian were also on board, Luxor province spokesman Badawi al-Masri said. Three people --two Britons and the pilot were hospitalised, and four passengers remain missing.



Balloon rides offering panoramic aerial views of the Nile River and the ancient temples of Karnak and Hatshepsut are a popular tourist attraction in Luxor, about nine hours' drive southeast of Cairo. This crash prompted Gov. Izzat Saad of Luxor Province to ban all hot air balloon flights until further notice. The last hot air balloon accident in Luxor occurred in 2009, when 16 foreign tourists were injured after a balloon struck a cell phone transmission tower. The previous most deadly accident in recent memory took place in 1989, when 13 people were killed after two hot air balloons collided in Australia.



EgyNews said that an Egyptian Government Spokesman Alaa Hadidi had announced that the Cabinet will form a Committee from the Ministry of Civil Aviation to investigate the cause of Tuesday's accident.



Courtesy of Flight Safety Information from Curt Lewis



4. HENLEY/GLOBAL AVIATION TRAINING


Should you wish to make a booking for any of these courses please contact Candice on 011 024 5446 or by email to
candice@gaconsultants.net


DATES COURSE LECTURER COST PER DELEGATE EXCL. VAT
11 Mar 2013 CRM Verity Wallace R 950-00
11 Mar 2013 DG Verity Wallace R 750-00
18 & 19 Mar 2013 Human Factors (MRM/CRM) Dr. Joel Hughes R2,100-00
25 & 26 Mar 2013 Quality Assurance Auditors Course Dan Drew R2,100-00
04 Apr 2013 CRM Verity Wallace R 950-00
04 Apr 2013 DG Verity Wallace R 750-00
08 to 12 Apr 2013 Integrated Safety Management Course Various R5,130-00
08 & 09 Apr 2013 Safety Management Systems (SMS) Dan Drew R2,100-00
15 & 16 Apr 2013 Crew Resource Management / Human Factors - Initial Dr. Joel Hughes R1,650-00
22 & 23 Apr 2013 Quality Assurance Auditor Course (2 day) Dan Drew R2,100-00


Note: Cost per delegate includes all training materials, refreshments, lunch and parking
Note: Attendees paying in cash on the day are eligible for a 10% discount
Note: Both Recurrent CRM and Dangerous Goods Training Courses are available upon request - even at short notice.



5. NCAA BOSS WARNS AGAINST CORRUPTIBLE AVIATION WORKERS



Director-General, Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority (NCAA), said that the compromising of Nigerian aviation workers portended grave threat to the sector. ``It is high time we raise alarm on the consequences of insider threat to our aviation security''. He said that the security of the nation's airports would not improve if it experienced ``insider`` threats, adding that such a trend ``will be quite unfortunate.`` Demuren urged the Federal Government to be diligent with the way it scrutinised security personnel that were protecting the country's airports. ``Aviation security remains the greatest challenge to safety of airport users and has assumed a source of worry to world aviation experts lately. ``Nations now work toward their aviation security personnel to be more vigilant because saboteurs, criminals and terrorists are evolving new ways to outwit them,” he said.



The NCAA boss expressed delight that the African Union (AU) has approved the 2012 Abuja Declaration which made it mandatory for every African country to be IATA Operational safety Audit (IOSA) compliant by 2015. He noted that being IOSA compliant was good for the continent, adding that it would enhance safety of the African airspace. ``We, here, will keep improving on safety of our aviation sector since we recognise that it is the engine of our economy.''



6. AIRLINE INDUSTRY AT ITS SAFEST SINCE THE DAWN OF THE JET AGE
Whilst this article has its roots in the USA some of the findings and statements are relevant to those of us in Africa. Editor.



It has been four years since the last fatal crash in the United States, a record unmatched since propeller planes gave way to the jet age more than half a century ago. Globally, last year was the safest since 1945, with 23 deadly accidents and 475 fatalities, according to the Aviation Safety Network. That was less than half the 1,147 deaths, in 42 crashes, in 2000. In the last five years, the death risk for passengers (in the United States) has been one in 45 million flights, according to Arnold Barnett, a professor of statistics at M.I.T.



In other words, flying has become so reliable that a traveller could fly every day for an average of 123,000 years before being in a fatal crash, he said. There are many reasons for this remarkable development. Planes and engines have become more reliable. Advanced navigation and warning technology has sharply reduced once-common accidents like midair collisions or crashes into mountains in poor visibility. Regulators, pilots and airlines now share much more extensive information about flying hazards, with the goal of preventing accidents rather than just reacting to them. And when crashes do occur, passengers are now more likely to survive. "The lessons of accidents used to be written in blood, where you had to have an accident, and you had to kill people to change procedures, or policy, or training," said Deborah Hersman, the chairwoman of the National Transportation Safety Board. "That's not the case anymore. We have a much more proactive approach to safety." Flying hazards, with the goal of preventing accidents rather than just reacting to them. And when crashes do occur, passengers are now more likely to survive. "The lessons of accidents used to be written in blood, where you had to have an accident, and you had to kill people to change procedures, or policy, or training," said Deborah Hersman, the chairwoman of the National Transportation Safety Board. "That's not the case anymore. We have a much more proactive approach to safety."



The grounding of the Boeing 787 fleet last month illustrates this new era of caution. The last time a fleet was grounded was 1979, after a McDonnell Douglas DC-10 crashed shortly after take-off at O'Hare Airport in Chicago, killing 273 people. The 787s, by contrast, were grounded after two episodes involving smoke from batteries in which no one was hurt and no planes were lost.



The last fatal accident involving a commercial flight in the United States was on the 12th February 2009 when Colgan Air Flight 3407, crashed near Buffalo, killing 50 people,. The pilot's manoeuvre was the opposite of what he should have done when ice formed on the wings. Perhaps even more noteworthy is the fact that there has not been an accident involving a major US domestic carrier since an American Airlines flight to the Dominican Republic crashed after take-off in Queens, New York in November 2001, killing all 260 people on board.



But while flying is safer, it is still not risk-free. Air traffic is set to grow in the next decade, and airports are more congested. Near-misses on runways and taxiways have risen. And with two million passengers in the United States boarding more than 30,000 flights every day, maintaining that safety record will be a challenge.



The Colgan accident also cast a troubling light on regional airlines, which hire young pilots, some with little experience, at a fraction of the salaries paid by bigger carriers. Since the crash, the Federal Aviation Administration has mandated longer resting periods for pilots. But in the face of opposition from airlines, it is still working on new rules for more extensive co-pilot training.



"It's important not to define safety as the absence of accidents," said Chesley B. Sullenberger III, the US Airways pilot who became a hero when he landed an Airbus A320 in the Hudson River in January 2009 after both engines lost power. All 155 aboard escaped. "When we've been through a very safe period, it is easy to think it's because we are doing everything right," he said. "But it may be that we are doing some things right, but not everything. We can't relax."



Not long ago, the industry's safety record was far bleaker. In 1985, more than 2,000 people died in dozens of crashes, including 520 when a Boeing 747 crashed in Japan. A crash of a Delta Air Lines Lockheed TriStar killed 134 in Dallas that year. After another series of accidents in 1996, federal officials set a goal of cutting accident rates by 80 percent over 10 years. That year, 340 people died in just two crashes in the United States -ValuJet Flight 592, a DC-9 that crashed in Florida, and TWA Flight 800, a Boeing 747 that blew up after its fuel tank exploded off Long Island, New York.



Since then, the F.A.A., airlines and pilot groups have stepped up efforts to share safety concerns through a series of voluntary programs. Airlines agreed to participate after obtaining assurances that the information would not be used to discipline them. An F.A.A. Web-based system, created in 2007, now includes information from 44 carriers. The result is widely viewed as successful because it has spawned an attitude that allows hazards to be identified before accidents occur. The F.A.A. and airlines now systematically study data from flight recorders to analyse common problems, like finding the best angle of approach and speed to land at airports with tricky wind conditions. Besides advances in navigation technology, today's airplanes are equipped with systems that can detect severe turbulence or wind shear, allowing pilots to avoid them altogether. Engines are also better built -when one fails, pilots can still land safely. "We have engineered out the common causes of accidents," said Patrick Smith, a commercial pilot who writes a blog called Ask the Pilot. Because planes have better hull and seat design, said Kevin Hiatt, the president of the Flight Safety Foundation, "crashes are more survivable today than decades ago." In August 2005, for instance, an Air France flight to Toronto overshot the runway and burst into flames, yet all 309 passengers and crew managed to escape.



Aviation Safety Officials will also go to considerable lengths to learn what caused a crash. Uncertainty is rarely tolerated, said Peter Goelz, a former Managing Director at the National Transportation Safety Board. After an Air France jet crashed in the Atlantic in 2009 on its way from Brazil to Paris, investigators spent nearly two years -and millions of dollars -looking for the flight data recorder. "Aviation, in particular, abhors a vacuum," Mr. Goelz said.



Mr. Smith said there was another reason for the safety record: "Luck is always going to be a part of it." The biggest battle still being fought is over co-pilot training. The F.A.A. missed a Congressional deadline for new rules requiring first officers to have at least 1,500 hours of flying, before being hired, instead of 250 hours today. The agency has proposed a compromise of 750 hours for former military pilots and 1,000 hours for pilots with an aviation college degree. But the F.A.A.'s work has been slowed by lobbying by the airlines, according to a recent report by the Transportation Department's Inspector General. Roger Cohen, President of the Regional Airline Association, said the F.A.A. should not set arbitrary numbers. "It's about quality training, not quantity," he said. But Mr. Sullenberger said: "Some in industry still are fighting so hard to weaken, to delay or to kill an important safety initiative. The lessons of Colgan have not been learned." Ray LaHood, the Transportation Secretary, said that the Colgan crash was his worst day in his four years on the job, and that he had worked closely with family members of victims in order to strengthen the pilot training rules. Even though he plans to step down soon, he said, the F.A.A. is "going to continue to work to get that over the finish line."



But the F.A.A.'s work has been slowed by lobbying by the airlines, according to a recent report by the Transportation Department's Inspector General. Roger Cohen, President of the Regional Airline Association, said the F.A.A. should not set arbitrary numbers. "It's about quality training, not quantity," he said. But Mr. Sullenberger said: "Some in industry still are fighting so hard to weaken, to delay or to kill an important safety initiative. The lessons of Colgan have not been learned." Ray LaHood, the Transportation Secretary, said that the Colgan crash was his worst day in his four years on the job, and that he had worked closely with family members of victims in order to strengthen the pilot training rules. Even though he plans to step down soon, he said, the F.A.A. is "going to continue to work to get that over the finish line."







7. IMPROVING AVIATION SAFETY, DRIVING AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT



This article first appeared in September 2012 Issue of Air News. Tony Chalmers - the Managing Editor -has kindly given us permission to reprint it here.



By Tony Tyler, Director-General of IATA



CONNECTIVITY IS crucial for the global economy. Air does it the best. And nowhere is that more evident than in Africa. Aviation supports 6,7-million jobs on the continent, with a significant proportion of those in high-tech and advanced skills work. In monetary terms, the industry stimulates a $67,8 billion contribution to Africa's GDP. Aviation facilitates tourism and business services, while air freight is crucial for the success of African organic produce, and supporting a growing manufacturing base.



Air transport expansion reflects this increasing importance to the economy. The latest air traffic growth forecast for Africa is 4,2% this year, compared with 3,5% for the rest of the world. This is helping to facilitate growth in the African economy which is also set to outpace the global average. GDP is expected to expand by 5,8% in 2013, compared with a global forecast of 3,6%. African governments have much to gain from pursuing growth and connectivity. Improved safety is absolutely central to that goal. Despite the many improvements seen with African aviation safety in recent years, the two tragic accidents that occurred in June this year in Accra and Lagos are sobering reminders that we still have a lot of work to do. Statistics show that, on average in 2011, there was one accident for every 305 000 flights on Western-built jets in Africa. That is nine times the global average. This is unacceptable. It is time for governments and industry to implement a strategic plan of action to make flying in Africa as safe as anywhere else in the world. African air transport accidents between 2006 and 2010 were characterised by runway excursions (over-runs or running off the sides of runways), controlled flight into terrain and loss of control.



IATA and the International Civil Aviation Organisation's (ICAO) joint analysis of these accidents identified insufficient regulatory oversight and the absence of safety management systems as major contributory factors. To address these, IATA together with ICAO and many of the leading aviation stakeholders and regulatory organisations, recently met in Johannesburg where they committed to an Africa Strategic Improvement Action Plan to tackle safety deficiencies and improve regulatory oversight of civil aviation. This plan was enhanced during the meeting of Directors General of Civil Aviation Authorities shortly afterwards, and became part of the Abuja Declaration on Aviation Safety in Africa endorsed by the African Union's Ministerial Meeting on Aviation Safety recently.



The Abuja Declaration has a target to bring the African accident rate in line with the global average by 2015, and an action plan to: Establish and strengthen civil aviation authorities with full autonomy and the resources to perform effective safety oversight. Implement Safety Management Systems for states and all service providers. Certify all international aerodromes and Require all African airlines to obtain an IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA) which includes implementation of Flight Data Analysis.



Global standards are the key. Governments must effectively regulate them. And airlines need to operate using them. Evidence already shows that global standards can make a difference in African aviation. IOSA is a requirement for all IATA member airlines. IOSA is an open programme, not an exclusive club. Of the 369 airlines on the IOSA registry at the end of 2011 about a third were not IATA members, and together the members' safety performance was 52% better than those carriers not on the registry. Furthermore, the safety performance of the African carriers on the IOSA registry was in line with the global IOSA average. Wider adoption of IOSA across Africa was a key part of the recent discussions in Abuja. In fact, requiring all African airlines to obtain IOSA is an effective “off-the-shelf” solution to enhance regulatory capability for resource-scarce governments. Wider adoption of IOSA across Africa was a key part of the recent discussions in Abuja. In fact, requiring all African airlines to obtain IOSA is an effective “off-the-shelf” solution to enhance regulatory capability for resource-scarce governments.



Over the years there have been many initiatives to improve African safety. Although progress has been made, the problem has not been solved. This time could be different. The eyes of the world are on the continent's economic expansion. It is a great opportunity to co-opt that into support - technical and financial - for connectivity that underpins economic ties. But that will only happen if there is a solid commitment on the part of African governments at the highest levels. Everyone knows what needs to be done. Now we need tangible signs from African governments for a strong and comprehensive follow-up programme. I am an African optimist. On four visits over the last year the immense potential of African aviation to play an even greater role in the continent's development was clear to me. And this potential has been recognised by IATA members, who have selected Cape Town as the venue for the IATA Annual General Meeting and World Air Transport Summit in June 2013. With the wholehearted commitment of African governments to implement the Abuja declaration and action plan, it will be an opportunity to showcase progress. The aviation industry is determined and eager to work with all governments and stakeholders in Africa to deliver the highest safety standards. Africa stands poised for an amazing decade of growth and opportunity, with aviation at its core. Let us be sure this chance is not missed.



8. EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING



Don't forget that the 2011 Civil Aviation Regulation 139.02.24 (b) (iii) states that aerodromes must have 3 monthly table top exercises so there is plenty of scope for you to offer to join in and practice what you have in your plan. It will also help you to identify missing information and/or procedures - Gap Analysis.



You should test your ERP regularly so the question we ask you is when did you last test your ERP? Should you need any assistance with testing and amending and/or updating your ERP please contact us on 011 024 5446 and speak with Rethea.



Blake Emergency Services is the International Crisis Management and Contingency Planning Consultancy who, although based in the UK, have serious experience in Africa having handled accidents, incidents, counselling, repatriation, DNA sampling and confirmation, in amongst others Lagos, Nigeria; Fez, Morocco; Pointe Noire, Congo; Moroni, Comores; Maputo, Mozambique. Please go to www.blakeemergency.com or contact rethea@blakeemergency.com



Blake Emergency Services Clients' and Members' Training Day is on the 16th March at the Old Edwardians Club in Johannesburg.



NTSB Uses Laser Scanners at Accident Scenes



The NTSB recently began using laser scanners as a replacement to standard camera photography to record important data at accident scenes. A camera records in two dimensions, but a laser scanner adds virtual reality by viewing evidence in three dimensions. The scanners mount on a tripod and rotate 360 degrees to digitally record everything within about 300 feet, accurately correlating the time for the signal to return to help build not only three-dimensional still photos, but also digital simulations of past events. Because the scanners cannot see the back of an object, the device is moved to a variety of locations at the scene to build a complete picture.



The data gathered from the scanners can be digitally reassembled to provide information accurate enough to measure tire skid marks or even the deformation of damaged vehicles. The digital scanners also mean that simulations can offer viewers the opportunity to put themselves at any location to observe what occurred before or during an accident.






9. SUPREME COURT PULLS UP AVIATION REGULATOR OVER IMPLEMENTATION OF SAFETY NORMS (INDIA)



New Delhi: The Supreme Court today (25 February 2013) issued a contempt notice to the Director General of Civil Aviation or DGCA for failing to comply with its orders to implement flight safety norms effectively. The top court had directed the DGCA in May 2011 to expedite the process of bringing new Civil Aviation Regulations or CAR to minimise accidents caused by pilot fatigue. The DGCA notified new regulations effective February 2012, but has been accused of not ensuring their implementation by all airline operators.


The new rules mandated that airlines must take into account a pilot's 'duty time' as against just 'flight time'. This means that a pilot's duty hours would include flight time spent as a passenger to report to a port of duty. The need for reviewing Flight Duty Timing Limitation or FDTL was brought into focus after the Mangalore plane crash of 2010 in which 158 people died. Investigation reports suggested that the pilot was asleep during part of the flight.


The Society for Welfare of Indian pilots had approached the Supreme Court seeking contempt action against the regulator. The petitioner's lawyer told the court that the DGCA is selectively relaxing rules for a few private airlines, putting passenger safety at risk. It also argued that the aviation regulator has failed to take action against those airlines flouting the rules. The top court said it is issuing the contempt notice to get clarifications from the DGCA, but has not mandated its representatives to personally appear in court.







10. NEWS FROM THE JOHANNESBURG AIRPORTS
FAGM - RAND AIRPORT, GERMISTON



Firstly we would like to welcome Mr. Christo Ebersohn as the new Managing Director of Rand Airport and look forward to meeting with him at the next Safety Meeting on the 5th of March.



Certain operators are in the habit of requesting and performing very low level turn outs after take-off. It is of concern that less experienced pilots may well come to grief while attempting to emulate other pilots. As a result ATNS will continue to advise pilots that no early turn outs be made lower than 200ft thus minimising this practise. Hangar owners are asked to be proactive in ensuring that their hangars are secured when they are unoccupied in order to reduce the risk of break-ins.


The Rand Airport Rescue and Fire Fighting Services Staff Members are qualified and available to administer first aid in the event of accidents and injuries. ATNS ask that all operators request permission from the Tower before towing any aircraft on a taxiway in order to avoid possible conflict with other aircraft under power. Pilots of aeroplanes parking on the main apron are to ensure that the aircraft nose wheel is on the numbered parking block in order to ensure that sufficient clearance exists for other aeroplanes to pass safely behind. All operators must escort their delivery vehicle(s) on the airside. Airport management reserves the right to bar or remove from the airside any such unescorted vehicle.



The March Safety Meeting is to be held at 09.00 on Tuesday 5th March



FAGC - GRAND CENTRAL AIRPORT, MIDRAND



Auto rotations should only be carried out at certain designated areas by Pilots and Instructors. Hovering presents a problem for ATC as if the Pilots do it in undesignated areas they cannot be seen by ATC. Helicopter Pilots must only call for lift once they are fully ready to depart. Children must not be permitted to wander about on airside unescorted whether they are passengers on aircraft or not. High visibility jackets/tabards/waistcoats are mandatory on airside. All operators should remember to report Hazards and Incidents to gcaopssup@grandcentral.co,za The March Safety Meeting is to be held at 12.00 on Tuesday 5th March.



FALA - LANSERIA AIRPORT - LANSERIA AIRPORT



The new runway work goes on at a great pace. If you need to know anything about how this will change your approach or departure then contact Charles Norvall at charles@lanseria.co.za. For those of you using the perimeter road I would urge you to stick to the absolute maximum 40km speed limit and drive to the limitations of the road which is very unstable with potholes and surface break ups due to the heavy lorries using it. The road is also covered with mud and water from the earth works and the lorries servicing the works. The March Safety Meeting is to be held at 12.00 on Tuesday 12th March.


11. COMMERCIAL AIRLINE/AIRPORT INFORMATION



American Airlines and US Airways have announced plans to merge, in a deal that would form the world's biggest airline. The merger will bring American Airlines closer in value to rival Delta Airlines, with an estimated market valuation of USD 11 billion. This marks the conclusion of talks that started back in August 2012. The airline will trade as American Airlines and be headed up by the current US Airways boss.



12. SAFETY/SECURITY TIPS OF THE MONTH GOVERNMENT WARNINGS



Cameroon (Security threat level -3): On 27 February 2013 the U.K. Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) updated its travel advice for Cameroon, which includes the following: "There have been reports of three armed robberies targeting expatriates in hotels in Limbe between 21 and 26 February. Substantial amounts of money and valuables were stolen and in one of the attacks, people were reportedly shot and injured. We advise that people travelling to Limbe exercise extreme caution and do not carry large amount of money or valuables particularly after dark."



Nigeria (Security threat level -5): On 27 February 2013 the U.K. Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) updated its travel advice for Nigeria. The FCO advises British citizens against all travel to Bauchi state and the city of Okene in Kogi state. The FCO also advises against all but essential travel to the states of Kaduna, Kano, Jigawa and Katsina. The updated travel advice comes in the wake of several recent attacks targeting expatriates in northern Nigeria and in neighbouring Cameroon.



SECURITY THREAT LEVEL DEFINITIONS
1 -Security issues rarely affect individuals or organizations. These locations have an extremely low rate of violent crime.
2 -Locations may have several low-level security issues, but these generally have minimal physical impact on individuals and organizations.
3 -Incidents of violent crime, terrorism and/or extremist activity occur more frequently, but are still sporadic.
4 -Incidents such as armed robbery, carjacking, civil unrest, terrorism and/or extremist activity can occur frequentl y, and there is a greater risk that security issues could physically impact individuals and organizations.
5 -Locations can be affected by rampant violent crime, volatile situations of civil unrest, frequent terrorist extremist attacks and/or open military conflict.



South African Civil Aviation Authority


Each month we shall share one of the SACAA CARS/CATS with you, which is relevant to a report or incident or discussion that has occurred during the month. The following is taken from the new 2011 Civil Aviation Regulations.


Documents to be retained on ground


127.04.1
(1) The operator of a commercial air transport helicopter engaged in a scheduled public air transport service operation shall ensure that - (a) copies of the relevant parts of the flight folio (b) the load and trim sheet (c) the passenger list or cargo manifest (d) the special loads notification, if applicable; and (e) a general declaration in the case of a helicopter engaged in international flights Are retained in a safe place at the first point of departure in respect of each flight undertaken by the helicopter
(2) The documents referred to in subregulation (1) shall be retained for a period of at least 90 days.



135.04.1
(2) The operator shall ensure that - (a) a copy of the OFP (b) Copies of the relevant parts of the flight folio (c) the load and trim sheet (d) the crew and passenger list and cargo manifest, if applicable and (e) the NOTOC, if applicable Are retained in a safe place at the first point of departure in respect of each flight undertaken by the aeroplane
(3) Except when otherwise instructed by the Director, the documents referred to in subregulation (2) shall be retained at the operator's main base of operations, or other location if approved by the Director, for a period of at least 90 days


121.04.1
(2) The operator shall ensure that - (a) a copy of the OFP (b) Copies of the relevant parts of the flight folio (c) the load and trim sheet specified in regulation 121.04.9 (d) the passenger list and/or cargo manifest (e) the NOTOC, if applicable (f) a general declaration in the case of an aeroplane engaged in international fights Are retained in a safe place at the first point of departure in respect of each flight undertaken by the aeroplane


(3) Except when otherwise instructed by the Director, the documents referred to in subregulation (2) shall be retained at the operator's main base of operations, or other location if approved by the Director, for a period of at least 90 days



13. ADVERTISEMENTS HENLEY AIR, HANGAR 6, RAND AIRPORT - FAGM



Henley Air proudly offers fully accredited AIETB and CAA approved helicopter training on piston and turbine type aircraft. It is the aim of HENLEY AIR to make your flight training experience an enjoyable one where personal attention by instructors ensures sound grounding in all aspects relating to helicopter flight. License courses offered are: Private Pilot License and Commercial Pilot License. Our rating courses include: Instructor, Instrument, Mountain, Night, Radio and Sling. See www.henleyair.co.za for further information



CAN YOU AFFORD TO BE WITHOUT A LIFE SAVING AED



If someone collapses with a sudden cardiac arrest on your aircraft or in your office or in your hanger what can you do? The truth is that if you do not respond within 10 minutes the person will probably die. Seremed provides a very affordable, portable and LIFE SAVING AED. Can you afford to be without one?
Contact global@gaconsultants.net or the Editor for more information.


14. . FINALE -Responses from readers of GAC UPDATE Per your Issue 22 -article 2.


Compared say with East Africa, West Africa is a shambles in terms of ATC/WX for aircraft operating in, out and overfly. The problem is compounded by having too many regional controllers and F.I.R. Boundaries all linked together, which are partly due to too many different countries placed together. Frequently we are entering Nigerian airspace with no contact at all with Lagos ATC. Sometimes we get stuck at cruise altitude with no descent clearance at 80nm from LOS at +/-FL370. The ATC frequency is clogged with light aircraft who fly short sectors and local routes both in Nigeria and neighbouring countries. This ends up with us doing our own controlling on their frequency - how's that!!

Solution with us “high boys” is to have a different frequency as one cannot handle it all i.e. split them and while you are at it make sure the radar is operational at LOS. Nigeria has the worst accident record in Africa which is not helped by ATC and Aerodrome incompetence. The presence of surly and aggressive
Controllers does not help. Other factors in this saga are the weather in this region as it is always hazy/cloudy/CB/ITCZ etc. if you were to look at significant weather charts for the region you will get an idea. When does Nigeria ever have a “gin clear” day? - never. The only plus point is the terrain i.e. there are no big hills.


Heavy Freighter Jock……….


Global Aviation Consultants accepts no liability for the content of this safety editorial, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided, unless that information is subsequently confirmed in writing. If you are not the intended recipient you are notified that disclosing, copying, distributing or taking any action in reliance on the contents of this information is strictly prohibited.


Global Aviation Consultants, Hanger 6, Spitfire Avenue, Rand Airport, Johannesburg, RSA
www.gaconsultants.net Tel: 011 024 5446 e-mail global@gaconsultants.net




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